Tim McMahon, Editor of Your Family Finances

My grandfather lived through the Hyperinflation in Weimar, Germany--to say he was an original “gold bug” would be an understatement. I began reading his “hard money” newsletters at the age of 16 and the dividends from gold stocks helped put me through college. I began publishing the Financial Trend Forecaster paper newsletter in 1995 upon the death of James Moore editor of Your Window into the Future and the creator of the Moore Inflation Predictor©. FTF specializes in trends in the stock market, gold, inflation and bonds. In January of 2003, I began publishing InflationData.com to specialize in all forms of information about the nature of Inflation. In 2009, we added Elliott Wave University to help teach you the principles of Elliott Wave analysis. In January 2013, we began publishing OptioMoney. Connect with Tim on Google+.

About Tim McMahon

Work by editor and author, Tim McMahon, has been featured in Bloomberg, CBS News, Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, Forbes, Washington Post, Drudge Report, The Atlantic, Business Insider, American Thinker, Lew Rockwell, Huffington Post, Rolling Stone, Oakland Press, Free Republic, Education World, Realty Trac, Reason, Coin News, and Council for Economic Education. Connect with Tim on Google+

Looking To Invest? Bonds To Consider

When you decide to invest money, it’s important to commit to doing the appropriate research that will protect your financial investment. When you think of saving you generally think of a bank. And when you think of investing generally you think of either stocks or bonds. Stocks are a form of ownership while bonds are a form of debt. So if you buy a stock you participate in the good fortune of a company but you also can participate in its losses. Bonds on the other hand are you loaning money to a company. You don’t participate in any appreciation you are simply paid interest for using your money. You also don’t have the risk of the company value decreasing. Even if a company goes bankrupt bondholders are ahead of stockholders in getting their money back. For this reason bonds normally have a lower yield than stocks, but also a lower risk.  There are several different types of bonds and bond funds. Typically the difference is based on the type of issuer but differences also come from how the bond is structured.

On Top of Things: Financing Roof Repairs before the Winter Months

If your roof shows signs of damage or wear, now is the time to get if fixed. Once the snow and ice build up on your roof, every thaw means running water that can creep into the tiniest cracks and gaps. The water can also re-freeze and expand, making the cracks worse. Melt water soaks into the wood and can do structural damage. This makes roof repairs even more expensive. If you haven’t been able to follow our advice and put aside an emergency fund for situations like this, here are some funding options to consider.

Hurricane! How to Get Compensation after Significant Home Damage

Hopefully, you’ve survived the recent hurricanes without incident, but with so many people suffering damage from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma you might be wondering how to get compensated if you suffer damage. For instance, suppose you are in the situation of my neighbor David. His roof was about 20 years old and so had about 5 years of life left in it before he was going to have to replace it. But along came hurricane Irma which ripped off about a dozen shingles and created leaks and potential leaks.

Teaching Children to Use Money Intelligently

The world is a magical place for kids. It’s a place of astronauts, princesses, and wonderful adventures. To them, money is just a thing that Moms and Dads use when it’s time to go out for ice cream. That’s all well and good, there’s no need for kids to know how to refinance a home (yet), but kids are smart, and it’s important that they know how to use money wisely. The best way to show them, is by showing them how money works in their life.

Home Improvements that Will Pay for Themselves Over Time

When you have extra money to put toward your home, it’s important to choose improvements that earn back your investment either immediately,  over time or when you sell your house. Below are seven simple improvements can be done in a weekend or less, and all of them put the spent cash right back into your bank account.

What to Do When Debt Piles Up

The simple fact is that debt equals stress, especially when that debt keeps growing. Even when you feel that there is no possible solution to your current debt situation, don’t lose hope. Options are available to help you to keep the debt from growing and to get yourself in a better financial position. Here’s what […]

Don’t Panic! 3 Stressful Fiscal Issues That Shouldn’t Blow Your Budget

While many major events can result in unexpected expenses and lost wages, these issues do not have to jeopardize your financial future.  Major life events can wreak havoc on your personal finances and that is why during ordinary times you should be building yourself a safety net. This net should ideally be six months to one year of living expenses. So if you typically average $3,000 per month in expenses (this includes rent/mortgage, food, gas, utilities, entertainment, everything) then you should have an emergency fund of at least $18,000! (6 x $3,000= $18,000) and preferably $36,000. If you don’t have at least the minimum you are at risk if one of the following events hits you.

Unique Ways to Find Extra Cash

If you’re short on money this month, you have options. Here are a few ideas that you can try if you would like to bring in a little bit of extra cash.